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Code of Behaviour

 

Scoil an Linbh Íosa, Killymard, Donegal Town

 

                                       Code of Behaviour       

 

The seed of good behaviour is rooted in good relations between parents/guardians,

pupils and the school. In Scoil an Linbh Íosa, we hope to foster this ideal in

co-operation with our parents/guardians. We have adopted a positive Code of Behaviour

with emphasis on encouragement and reward so that good behaviour can prevail

in our school.

 

The Board of Management has ultimate responsibility for behaviour in the school.   The overall day to day responsibility for behaviour rests with the Principal.  Each teacher has responsibility for the maintenance of good behaviour within his/her classroom while sharing a common responsibility for good behaviour within the school premises. Each teacher has supervision duties allocated during break and lunch times on a rota basis.

 

Parents/guardians can support the school by encouraging their children to understand the need for school rules and by communicating any relevant concerns

to the school.  As the Board of Management is responsible for the health and safety of all staff and pupils, parents are requested not to approach or reprimand another person’s child on the school premises.

 

Aims of the code

 

  • To create a positive learning environment that encourages and reinforces good behaviour
  • To promote self-esteem and positive relationships
  • To encourage consistency of response to both positive and negative behaviour
  • To foster a sense of responsibility and self-discipline in pupils and to support good behaviour patterns based on respect for the rights of others
  • To facilitate the education and development of every child
  • To foster caring attitudes to one another and to the environment
  • To enable teachers to teach and pupils to learn without disruption
  • To ensure that the school’s expectations and strategies are widely known and understood through the availability of policies and an ethos of communication
  • To encourage the involvement of both home and school in the implementation of this policy

Responsibility of Adults

The adults encountered by the pupils at school have an important responsibility to model high standards of behaviour, both in their dealings with the pupils and with each other, as their example has an important influence on the pupils.

 

 

As adults we will aim to:

  • Create a positive climate with realistic expectations.
  • Promote positive behaviour, through example, honesty and courtesy.
  • Provide a caring and effective learning environment.
  • Encourage relationships based on kindness, respect and understanding of the needs of others.
  • Ensure fair treatment for all regardless of age, gender, race, ability and disability.
  • Show appreciation of the efforts and contribution of everyone in our school

School Rules

 

Between children and adults, over 230 people spend the day in Scoil an Linbh Íosa.  Therefore, we need rules.  We need these rules so that each of us may have a safe and peaceful day at school. School Rules apply during school-time and during all external school activities. Here are the things you should do during the course of the school day.

 

1.(a)Arrival

When you arrive, walk carefully towards the school playground.  Before crossing look back to make sure there are no cars coming.  Enter the school building through the back door. No running in the classroom at any time.

(b)Bells

When the bell rings while you are in the playground, you should line up. When you arrive in your room, sit in your seat. When the bell rings while you’re in your classroom, line up as above when your teacher tells you.  Single lane – one-way traffic on the corridor.

(c)The Playground

While in the playground, stay on the tarmacadam all the time.  Stay off the grass and the ‘Striped No-Go Area.’  If you have a problem speak to the teacher on yard duty.  If you wish to go into the school building for any reason (e.g. toilet, feeling sick, etc.) you must get permission from the teacher.  Please use the toilet before you go out to play.

(d)Departure/Going Home

Walk down the corridor (single lane / one-way) when your teacher tells you. Be careful when you go out through the gates. Be very careful on your way to and in the car park.  Also watch for the teachers’ cars.  If you are waiting on a bus or your parents to collect you, stay in the playground behind the white line.

 

  1. show respect for self, other pupils and adults
  2. show respect for our own property and the property of others
  3. show respect for the learning of other pupils
  4. be kind and willing to help others
  5. follow instructions from staff immediately
  6. show courtesy and good manners
  7. try to use respectful ways of resolving difficulties and conflict
  8. do your best in class
  9. take responsibility for your own work

 

Class Rules

At the beginning of each school year, the class teacher will agree a list of class rules with the pupils. Class rules will be kept to a minimum and are devised with regard for the health, safety and welfare of all members of the school community.  Where possible they emphasise positive behaviour (e.g. ‘Walk’ and not, ‘Don’t run’).  Rules will be applied in a fair and consistent manner, with due regard to the age of the pupils and to individual difference.

Incentives/Reward System                       

Part of the vision of Scoil an Linbh Íosa is to help pupils achieve their personal best and thus prepare them for further education, work and life.  We recognise that there are many different forms of intelligence and similarly that pupils use a variety of approaches to solve problems.  Our reward system seeks to provide encouragement to all pupils of all abilities and talents. Pupils will be encouraged, praised and listened to by adults in the school. Praise is earned by the maintenance of good standards as well as by particularly noteworthy personal achievements. Praise for behaviour should be as high as for school work.  Praise might be given in the following ways:

  • A quiet word or gesture to show approval
  • A comment in a pupil’s copy or Homework Journal
  • A visit to another member of staff or to the Principal for commendation
  • A word of praise in front of a group or class
  • Delegating some special responsibility or privilege
  • A mention to parent, written or verbal communication
  • ‘Bualadh Bos’ in class or special mention at assembly
  • Annual school tours, field-trips and outings will be for those who behave well consistently.

Unacceptable Behaviour

 

Unacceptable behaviour will be classified as Minor, Serious or Gross and will be assessed by the teaching staff based on a common sense approach with regard to the gravity, frequency and context of these behaviours.  The frequency and gravity of unacceptable behaviours at minor and serious levels may warrant upgrading to the next level.

 

Examples of minor unacceptable behaviour include:

 

  •   talking out of turn
  • distracting other pupils
  • skitting or laughing deliberately and needlessly
  • passing notes around
  •  moving out of seat
  •  regularly forgetting books etc.
  •  running or jumping inside school building
  •  placing unfinished food in bins
  • littering
  • bringing electronic equipment or mobile-phones to school

 

Examples of serious unacceptable behaviour include:

 

  • constantly disruptive in class
  • harassment based on any of the nine grounds in the equality legislation.
  • bullying (be guided by our Anti-Bullying Policy)
  • lack of respect
  • unacceptance of reprimand
  • un-cooperativeness with staff
  • using bad language
  • being untruthful
  • leaving school grounds without permission
  • theft of or damage to school or other people’s property
  • encouraging and/or supporting unacceptable behaviour in others
  • endangering self/fellow-pupils

 

Examples of gross unacceptable behaviour include:

 

  • theft
  • bullying (be guided by our Anti-Bullying Policy)
  • possession of drugs, alcohol, tobacco and other harmful substances
  • bringing weapons to school
  • aggressive, threatening or violent behaviour towards another pupil or member of staff.
  • deliberately injuring another pupil or member of staff
  • sexual assault
  • deliberate and malicious damage to school building, contents, grounds and                 property belonging to another pupil or member of staff
  • making false allegations against another pupil or member of staff

 

Sanctions

The purpose of a sanction is to bring about a change in behaviour by:

  • helping pupils to learn that their behaviour is unacceptable
  • helping pupils to recognise the effect of their actions and behaviour on others
  • helping pupils (in ways appropriate to their age and development) to understand that they have choices about their own behaviour and that all choices have consequences. Care will be taken with SEN pupils to help them understand the purpose of sanctions.
  • helping pupils to learn to take responsibility for their behaviour
  •    reinforcing the boundaries set out in the Code of Behaviour
  •  signalling to other pupils and to staff that their wellbeing is being protected
  •  preventing serious disruption of teaching and learning
  •  keep the pupil, or other pupils or adults, safe

 

 

Good practice in the use of sanctions:

  • ensures that they are used in a respectful way that helps pupils to understand the consequences of their behaviour and to take responsibility for changing.
  • defuse not escalate a situation
  • preserve the dignity of all parties
  • be applied in a fair and consistent way
  • be timely

Sanctions will relate as closely as possible to the unacceptable behaviour.  The standards and rules contained in this Code of Behaviour will apply in any situation where the pupil, although outside the school, is still the responsibility of the school e.g. tours, games and other extracurricular activities.

The following sanctions may be applied when a pupil presents with unacceptable behaviour (list is in no particular order). See Appendix 1 : Application of Sanctions to the three levels of Unacceptable Behaviour.

  • Reasoning with pupil. Verbal reprimand including advice on how to improve
  • Temporary separation from peers within class and/or temporary removal to another class
  • Prescribing extra work to be done at home and parents to sign Notification Form and return to relevant teacher
  • Loss of privileges e.g. class activity such as outing, visiting coach/speaker
  • Teacher contact parents by telephone
  • Referral to Principal (teacher should send for Principal)
  • Principal contact parents by telephone
  • Formal report to the Board of Management
  • Suspension under section 23(2) of the Education (Welfare) Act 2000
  • Expulsion under section 23(2) of the Education (Welfare) Act 2000

Suspension and Expulsion

Before serious sanctions such as suspension or expulsion are used, the normal channels of communication between teachers and parents will be utilised.

Suspension

The Board of Management has the authority to suspend a pupil.  The Board has also delegated this authority to the Principal.  This delegation has been proposed, seconded and recorded in the minutes of the Board and authorises the Principal to suspend a pupil for a period not exceeding three school days.  The Principal is accountable to the Board of Management for his use of this authority and therefore must inform the Board of any suspensions.

 

The Grounds for Suspension

 

Suspension should be a proportionate response to the unacceptable behaviour that is causing concern.  Normally, other interventions will have been tried before suspension, and teachers will have reviewed the reasons why these have not worked.  The decision to suspend a pupil requires grounds such as :

 

  • The pupil’s behaviour has had a seriously detrimental effect on the education of other pupils.
  • The pupil’s continued presence in the school at this time constitutes a threat to safety
  • The pupil is responsible for serious damage to property.

 

A single incident of serious unacceptable behaviour may be grounds for suspension.

 

Forms of Suspension

 

Immediate suspension

 

In exceptional circumstances the Principal may consider an immediate suspension to be necessary where the continued presence of the pupil in the school would represent a threat to the safety of that pupil, other pupils, staff or any other person.  Fair procedures must be applied.

 

Automatic suspension

 

The Board of Management may decide, as part of the school’s policy on sanctions that particular named unacceptable behaviours incur suspension as a sanction. Due process and fair procedures must be followed in each case.

 

Rolling suspension

 

A pupil should not be suspended again shortly after returning to school unless he/she engages in unacceptable behaviour that warrants suspension, fair procedures are applied and the standard applied to judging the unacceptable behaviour is the same to the standard applied to any other pupil.

 

Informal/unacknowledged suspension or voluntary withdrawal

 

Asking parents to keep a pupil from school for even part of the day as a sanction, is a suspension. Any such exclusion imposed by the school as a sanction is suspension and therefore not permitted under this policy.

 

Open-ended suspension

 

Pupils should not be suspended for an indefinite period. Any such suspension would be regarded as de-facto expulsion and would be treated as such under section 29 of the Education Act 1998.

 

 

Procedures in respect of suspension

 

Inform pupil and parents

 

Let the pupil and parents know about the complaint, how it will be investigated, and that it could result in suspension. Parents may be informed by phone or in writing, depending on the seriousness of the matter. Informing parents in writing has the benefit of ensuring that there is a formal and permanent record of having let parents know. It also ensures that parents are clear about what their child is alleged to have done. It serves the important function of underlining to parents the seriousness with which the school views the alleged  unacceptable behaviour

 

 

Opportunity to respond

 

Parents and pupil should be given an opportunity to respond before a decision is made and before any sanction is imposed. A meeting provides an opportunity for them to give their side of the story and to ask questions about the evidence. Where parents do not agree to meet with the Principal, written notification will serve as notice to impose a suspension.

 

 

 

Procedures in relation to immediate suspension

 

Where an immediate suspension is considered by the Principal to be warranted for reasons of the safety of the pupil, other pupils, staff or others, a preliminary investigation should be conducted to establish the case for the imposition of the suspension. The formal investigation should immediately follow. All of the conditions for suspension apply to immediate suspension. In the case of an immediate suspension, parents must be notified, and arrangements made with them for the pupil to be collected. The school must have regard to its duty of care for the pupil. In no circumstances should a pupil be sent home from school without first notifying parents.

 

  Period of suspension

 

A pupil should not be suspended for more than three days, except in exceptional circumstances where the Principal considers that a period of suspension longer than three days is needed in order to achieve a particular objective. The Board of Management will provide guidance to the Principal concerning the kinds of circumstances under which suspensions of longer than three days might be approved. If a suspension longer than three days is being proposed by the Principal, the matter should be referred to the Board of Management for consideration and approval.

The Board of Management has authorised the Principal, with the approval of the Chairperson, to impose a suspension of up to five days in circumstances where a

meeting of the Board cannot be convened in a timely fashion, subject to the guidance concerning such suspensions. This delegation has been proposed, seconded and recorded in the minutes of the Board.

The Board of Management will normally place a ceiling of ten days on any one period of

suspension imposed by it. The Board will formally review any proposal to suspend a pupil, where the suspension would bring the number of days for which the pupil has been suspended in the current school year to twenty days or more. Any such suspension is subject to appeal under section 29 of the Education Act 1988.

 

Appeals

 

The Board of Management will offer an opportunity to appeal a Principal’s decision to suspend. In the case of decisions to suspend made by the Board of Management an

appeals process may be provided by the Patron.

Where the total number of days for which the student has been suspended in the current school year reaches twenty days, the parents may appeal the suspension

under section 29 of the Education Act 1998, as amended by the Education (Miscellaneous Provisions) Act 2007.

At the time when parents are being formally notified of such a suspension, they will

be told about their right to appeal to the Secretary General of the Department of Education and Skills under section 29 of the Education Act 1998, and will be given information about how to appeal.

 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                            

 

Implementing the suspension

 

  Written notification

 

The Principal will notify the parents in writing of the decision to suspend confirming :

  • the period of the suspension and the dates on which the suspension will begin and end
  • the reasons for the suspension
  • any study programme to be followed
  • the arrangements for returning to school, including any commitments to be entered into by the pupil and the parents (e.g. to reaffirm their commitment to the Code of Behaviour)
  • the provision for an appeal to the Board of Management

the provision for an appeal to the Patron

  • the right to appeal to the Secretary General of the Department of Education and Skills (Education Act 1998, section 29).

 

Engaging with pupil and parents

 

Where a decision to suspend has been made, it can maximise the impact and value of suspension if the Principal or another teacher delegated by the Principal meets with the parents to emphasise their responsibility in helping the pupil to behave well on returning to school and to offer help and guidance in this.

Where parents do not agree to meet with the Principal, written notification will serve as notice to impose a suspension.

 

 Grounds for removing a suspension

 

A suspension may be removed if the Board of Management decides to remove the suspension for any reason or if the Secretary General of the Department of Education and Skills directs that it be removed following an appeal under section 29 of the Education Act 1998.

 

 After the suspension ends

 

A period of suspension will end on the date given in the letter of notification to the parents about the suspension. The school will have a plan to help the pupil  to take responsibility for catching up on work missed. This plan will help to avoid the possibility that suspension starts or amplifies a cycle of academic failure. Successful re-integration goes beyond academic work. A suspended pupil may feel angry or resentful about their suspension, and these feelings can trigger problems with reintegration which, in turn, may lead to further problem behaviour. Where possible, the school will arrange for a teacher to provide support to the pupil  during the re-integration process.

When any sanction, including suspension, is completed, a pupil will be given the opportunity and support for a fresh start.

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Records and reports

 

Formal written records will  be kept of :

  • the investigation (including notes of all interviews held)
  • the decision-making process
  • the decision and the rationale for the decision
  • the duration of the suspension and any conditions attached to

the suspension.

 

Report to the Board of Management  : The Principal will report all suspensions to the Board of Management, with the reasons for and the duration of each suspension.

 

Report to EWS : The Principal is required to report suspensions in accordance with the EWS reporting guidelines (Education (Welfare) Act, 2000, section 21(4)(a)).

 

 Review of use of suspension

 

The Board of Management will review the use of suspension in the school at regular intervals to ensure that its use is consistent with school policies, that patterns of use are examined to identify factors that may be influencing behaviour in the school and to ensure that use of suspension is appropriate and effective.

 

Expulsion

 

A pupil is expelled when the Board of Management makes a decision to permanently exclude him or her from the school, having complied with the provisions of section 24 of the Education(Welfare) Act 2000. As part of this Code of Behaviour, the Board of Management  has the following policy on and procedures for expulsion.

 

 Authority to expel

 

The Board of Management  has the authority to expel a pupil. This authority is reserved for the Board and will not be delegated.

 

 Grounds for expulsion

 

Expulsion should be a proportionate response to a pupil’s behaviour. Expulsion is a

very serious step, and one that should only be taken by the Board of Management in gross cases of unacceptable behaviour. The school should have taken significant steps to address the unacceptable behaviour and to avoid expulsion including, as appropriate:

  • meeting with parents and pupil to try to find ways of helping the student to change their behaviour
  • making sure that the pupil understands the possible consequences of their behaviour,
  • ensuring that all other possible options have been tried
  • seeking the assistance of support agencies (e.g. NEPS, HSE Community Services, SESS, CAMHS, NCSE/SENO). 12

A proposal to expel a pupil requires gross grounds as described in this Code of Behaviour to such an extent that  :

  • the pupil’s behaviour is a persistent cause of significant disruption to the learning of others or to the teaching process
  • the pupil’s continued presence in the school constitutes a real and significant threat to safety

 

Automatic expulsion

 

A Board of Management may decide, as part of the school’s policy on sanctions that particular named unacceptable behaviours incur expulsion as a sanction. However, a general decision to impose expulsion for named behaviours does not remove the duty to follow due process and fair procedures.

 

Expulsion for a first offence

 

There may be exceptional circumstances where the Board of Management forms the opinion that a pupil should be expelled for a first offence. The kinds of unacceptable behaviour that might result in a proposal to expel on the basis of a single breach of this Code will include:

  • a serious threat of violence against another student or member of staff
  • actual violence or physical assault
  • supplying illegal drugs to other pupils in the school
  • sexual assault.

 

 Determining the appropriateness of expelling a student

 

Given the seriousness of expulsion as a sanction the Board of Management will be guided by “Factors to consider……” (Developing a Code of Behaviour: Guidelines for Schools Page 82)

in deciding whether to expel.

.

Procedures in respect of expulsion

 

Schools are required by law to follow fair procedures as well as procedures prescribed under the Education (Welfare) Act 2000, when proposing to expel a pupil.

Where a preliminary assessment of the facts confirms gross unacceptable behaviour that

could warrant expulsion, the procedural steps will include:

 

  1. A detailed investigation carried out under the direction of the Principal.
  2. A recommendation to the Board of Management by the Principal.
  3. Consideration by the Board of Management of the Principal’s recommendation; and the holding of a hearing.
  4. Board of Management deliberations and actions following the hearing.
  5. Consultations arranged by the Educational Welfare Officer.
  6. Confirmation of the decision to expel.

 

The Board of Management will decide which of the tasks involved

in these procedural steps requires separate meetings and which tasks can be

accomplished together in a single meeting, consistent with giving parents due notice of meetings and a fair and reasonable time to prepare for a Board hearing.

 

Step 1: A detailed investigation carried out under the direction of the Principal will :

  • inform the pupil and parents about the details of the alleged unacceptable behaviour, how it will be investigated and that it could result in expulsion
  • give parents and pupil every opportunity to respond to the complaint of alleged gross unacceptable behaviour before a decision is made and before a sanction is imposed.

 

Parents will be informed in writing of the alleged unacceptable behaviour and the proposed investigation in order to have a permanent record of having let them know. This also ensures that parents are very clear about what their child is alleged to have done. It serves the important function of underlining to parents the seriousness with which the school views the alleged unacceptable behaviour.

 

Step 2: A recommendation to the Board of Management by the Principal

 

Where the Principal forms a view, based on the investigation of the alleged unacceptable behaviour, that expulsion may be warranted, the Principal will make a recommendation to the Board of Management to consider expulsion. The Principal should:

  • inform the parents and pupil that the Board of Management is being asked to consider expulsion
  • ensure that parents have records of the allegations against the pupil, the investigation and written notice of the grounds on which the Board of Management is being asked to consider expulsion
  • provide the Board of Management with the same comprehensive records as are given to parents
  • notify the parents of the date of the hearing by the Board of Management and invite them to that hearing
  • advise the parents that they can make a written and oral submission to the Board of Management
  • ensure that parents have enough notice to allow them to prepare for the hearing.

 

Step 3: Consideration by the Board of Management of the Principal’s      recommendation and the holding of a hearing 

 

It is the responsibility of the Board to review the initial investigation and satisfy itself that the

investigation was properly conducted in line with fair procedures. The Board will undertake its own review of all documentation and the circumstances of the case. It will ensure that no party who has had any involvement with the circumstances of the case is part of the Board’s deliberations (e.g. a Board member who may have made an allegation about the pupil).

 

Where the Board of Management decides to consider expelling a student, it will hold a hearing. The Board meeting for the purpose of the hearing should be properly conducted in accordance with Board procedures. At the hearing, the Principal and the parents put their case to the Board in each other’s presence. Each party will be allowed to question the evidence of the other party directly. The meeting may also be an opportunity for parents to make their case for lessening the sanction. In the conduct of the hearing, the Board must take care to ensure that they are, and are seen to be, impartial as between the Principal and the pupil. Parents may wish to be accompanied at hearings and the Board will facilitate this in line with good practice and Board procedures.

After both sides have been heard, the Board will ensure that the Principal and parents are not present for the Board’s deliberations.

 

Step 4: Board of Management deliberations and actions following the hearing

 

Having heard from all the parties, it is the responsibility of the Board to decide whether or not the allegation is substantiated and, if so, whether or not expulsion is the appropriate sanction. Where the Board of Management, having considered all the facts of the case, is of the opinion that the pupil should be expelled, the Board must notify the Educational Welfare Officer in writing of its opinion, and the reasons for this opinion. (Education (Welfare) Act   2000, s24(1)).

The Board of Management will refer to the Educational Welfare Services reporting procedures for proposed expulsions. The pupil cannot be expelled before the passage of twenty school days from the date on which the EWO receives this written notification (Education (Welfare) Act 2000, s24(1)).

The Board should inform the parents in writing about its conclusions and the next steps in the process. Where expulsion is proposed, the parents should be told that the Board of Management will inform the Educational Welfare Officer.

 

Step 5: Consultations arranged by the Educational Welfare Officer

 

Within twenty days of receipt of a notification from a Board of Management of its opinion that a pupil should be expelled, the Educational Welfare Officer must:

  • make all reasonable efforts to hold individual consultations with the Principal, the parents, the pupil, and anyone else who may be of assistance
  • convene a meeting of those parties who agree to attend (Education (Welfare) Act 2000, section 24).

The purpose of the consultations and the meeting is to ensure that arrangements are made for the pupil to continue in education. These consultations may result in an agreement about an alternative intervention that would avoid expulsion. However, where the possibility of continuing in the school is not an option, at least in the short term, the consultation should focus on alternative educational possibilities. In the interests of the educational welfare of the pupil, those concerned should come together with the Educational Welfare Officer to plan for the pupil’s future education.

Pending these consultations about the pupil’s continued education, the Board of Management may take steps to ensure that good order is maintained and that the safety of pupils is secured (Education (Welfare) Act 2000, s24(5)) and therefore may consider it appropriate to suspend the pupil during this time. Suspension will only be considered where there is a likelihood that the continued presence of the pupil during this time will seriously disrupt the learning of others, or represent a threat to the safety of other pupils or staff.

 

Step 6: Confirmation of the decision to expel

 

Where the twenty-day period following notification to the Educational Welfare Officer has elapsed and where the Board of Management remains of the view that the pupil should be expelled, the Board will formally confirm the decision to expel (this task might be delegated

to the Chairperson and the Principal). Parents should be notified immediately that the expulsion will now proceed.

Parents and pupil will be told about the right to appeal and supplied with the standard form on which to lodge an appeal. A formal record should be made of the decision to expel the pupil

.

Appeals

 

A parent  may appeal a decision to expel to the Secretary General of the Department of Education and Skills (Education Act 1998 section 29). An appeal may also be brought by the Educational Welfare Services on behalf of a pupil

 

The appeals process

 

The appeals process under section 29 of the Education Act 1998 begins with the provision of

mediation by a mediator nominated by the Appeals Committee (Department of Education and Skills). For further details about the appeals process, including requirements for documentation, and the steps in the process, refer to current DES guidance.

 

 Review of use of expulsion

 

The Board of Management will review the use of expulsion in the school at regular intervals to ensure that its use is consistent with school policies, that patterns of use are examined to identify factors that may be influencing behaviour in the school, and to ensure that expulsion is used appropriately.

 

 

 

 

This Code of Behaviour was approved by the Board of Management on 26th May 2015 and will be implemented in the school on 1st September 2015.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Scoil an Linbh Íosa, Killymard, Donegal Town

Code of Behaviour Appendix 1:

 

Application of Sanctions to the three levels of Unacceptable Behaviour

 

Sanctions

The purpose of a sanction is to bring about a change in behaviour by:

  • helping pupils to learn that their behaviour is unacceptable
  • helping pupils to recognise the effect of their actions and behaviour on others
  • helping pupils (in ways appropriate to their age and development) to understand that they have choices about their own behaviour and that all choices have consequences.

Care will be taken with SEN pupils to help them understand the purpose of sanctions.

  • helping pupils to learn to take responsibility for their behaviour
  •    reinforcing the boundaries set out in the Code of Behaviour
  •  signalling to other pupils and to staff that their wellbeing is being

protected

  •  preventing serious disruption of teaching and learning
  •  keeping the pupil, or other pupils or adults, safe

Good practice in the use of sanctions:

  • ensures that they are used in a respectful way that helps pupils to understand the consequences of their behaviour and to take responsibility for changing.
  • defuse not escalate a situation
  • preserve the dignity of all parties
  • be applied in a fair and consistent way
  • be timely

 Unacceptable Behaviour and Application of Sanctions

 

Unacceptable behaviour will be classified as Minor, Serious or Gross and will be assessed by the teaching staff based on a common sense approach with regard to the gravity, frequency and context of these behaviours.  The frequency and gravity of unacceptable behaviours at minor and serious levels may warrant upgrading to the next level.

The following sanctions will relate as closely as possible to the unacceptable behaviour.  The standards and rules contained in this Code of Behaviour will apply in any situation where the pupil, although outside the school, is still the responsibility of the school e.g. tours, games and other extracurricular activities.

 

Examples of minor unacceptable behaviour and application of sanctions :

  •  talking out of turn
  • distracting other pupils
  • skitting or laughing deliberately and needlessly
  • passing notes around
  •  moving out of seat
  •  regularly forgetting books etc.
  • running or jumping inside school building
  • placing unfinished food in bins
  • littering
  • bringing electronic equipment or mobile-phones to school

 

Sanctions : 1. Reasoning with pupil. Verbal reprimand including advice on how   to improve.   2. Temporary separation from peers within class and/or temporary removal to another class.   3.  Prescribing extra work to be done at home and parents to sign Notification Form and return to relevant teacher 4.  Teacher contact parents by telephone.

Examples of serious unacceptable behaviour and application of sanctions :

  • constantly disruptive in class
  • harassment based on any of the nine grounds in the equality legislation.
  • bullying (be guided by our Anti-Bullying Policy)
  • lack of respect
  • unacceptance of reprimand
  • uncooperativeness with staff
  • using bad language
  • being untruthful
  • leaving school grounds without permission
  • theft of or damage to school or other people’s property
  • encouraging and/or supporting unacceptable behaviour in others
  • endangering self/fellow-pupils

 

Sanctions :  1. Prescribing extra work to be done at home and parents to sign Notification Form and return to relevant teacher. 2. Loss of privileges e.g. class activity such as outing, visiting coach/speaker. 3. Referral to Principal (teacher should send for Principal) 4. Teacher contact parents by telephone. 5. Principal contact parents by telephone 6. Suspension under section 23(2) of the Education (Welfare) Act 2000

 

Examples of gross unacceptable behaviour and application of sanctions :

  • theft
  • bullying (be guided by our Anti-Bullying Policy)
  • possession of drugs, alcohol, tobacco and other harmful substances
  • bringing weapons to school
  • aggressive, threatening or violent behaviour towards another pupil or member of staff.
  • deliberately injuring another pupil or member of staff
  • sexual assault
  • deliberate and malicious damage to school building, contents, grounds

and  property belonging to another pupil or member of staff

  • making false allegations against another pupil or member of staff

 

Sanctions : 1. Referral to Principal (teacher should send for Principal).

  1. Principal contact parents by telephone. 3. Suspension under section 23(2) of the Education (Welfare) Act. 4. Formal report to the Board of Management. 2000. 5. Expulsion under section 23(2) of the Education (Welfare) Act 2000

 

Scoil an Linbh Íosa, Killymard, Donegal Town

 

Code of Behaviour Appendix 1

 

Notification Form for Sanctions

                                                                                                  

Date: __________

 

Pupil:    ______________________________

 

Class:  _______________________________

 

 

Dear                                         ,

 

_____________________  has been prescribed extra work to be done at home.  This sanction is being applied for unacceptable behaviour described in our Code of Behaviour as follows:

 

Minor :    _____________________________________________

 

_____________________________________________

 

_____________________________________________

 

or

 

Serious:  _____________________________________________

 

_____________________________________________

 

_____________________________________________

 

Please sign below and return this form to me tomorrow.

 

 

Yours sincerely,

 

 

_____________________

Teacher

 

 

Signature of parent/guardian:  ____________________________